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‘I’m Just so Blessed’: Rapper Looks to Inspire Others After God Changed His Life in Prison

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The rapper knows that with fame comes responsibility, and he has a message for fans looking to achieve the same success: don’t follow the path he did.


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Carly Hoilman

Rapper Keak da Sneak was released from prison last month after serving five months for possession of a firearm as a convicted felon. In an interview with local station KPIX-TV, the Oakland-based artist shared how God used the experience to shift his perspective for the better.

“I’m just so blessed, I’m happy, I’m free,” he told KPIX reporter Betty Yu at his recording studio. “God works in mysterious ways, I think He just wanted me to see how fast you can throw your life away, or throw your freedom away.”

Keak, best known for the popular Bay Area track, Super Hyphy, has been wheelchair-bound since 2017, when he was shot eight times at a gas station in Richmond. That was the second shooting he survived in the same year, after which he says he began carrying a gun for protection. 

During his time behind bars, fans launched a petition in support of his plea to serve his time on house arrest. Though this wasn’t granted, officials agreed to move him to a facility with better medical care, according to KPIX.

Keak still suffers severe lower body pain from his injury, and though recovery has been strenuous, he is grateful to be alive and hopeful that he will walk again.

On Monday, the rapper posted a video to Instagram on his way to therapy, encouraging his fans to be “positive” and “productive.”

“it’s Therapy Monday’s Everybody have a BLESSED DAY,” he wrote.

Keak said he’s been humbled by the show of support since his return to the rap game. Days after his release, he joined rapper G-Eazy onstage to perform Super Hyphy in front of 40,000 fans at the Rolling Loud Festival. 

“I don’t think no drug can amount to that feeling of being on stage and thousands of people wanting to see you and happy that you’re up there,” Keak, whose real name is Charles Kente Williams, told KQED-FM.

“It’s a natural body high like, ‘Wow, they love me still,’ you know what I mean?” he told KPIX. “I really needed to see that.”

The rapper knows that with fame comes responsibility, and he has a message for fans looking to achieve the same success: don’t follow the path he did.

“Hard work and dedication,” he stressed, “and there ain’t nothing but drama on the street after midnight, so with that being said, be indoors.”