A New Approach to Medicine That Truly Puts the Patient First

After years as a doctor, Dr. Bayne still makes house calls. Through his work, he has a unique perspective on his patients and what it means to care well.

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A New Approach to Medicine That Truly Puts the Patient First

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After years as a doctor, Dr. Bayne still makes house calls. Through his work, he has a unique perspective on his patients and what it means to care well.


Caring for our community around us is a powerful way to give back. Dr. Gresham Bayne has experienced this first hand, having practiced medicine since 1973. He’s lived in San Diego for 40 years and has become increasingly integrated into his own community through medicine. In this episode of In My Day, we hear from Dr. Bayne about a specific interaction with a patient that influenced his view on medicine. “The purity of the doctor-patient relationship is sanctified in history,” Dr. Bayne says. Patients rely on the doctor’s good intentions and, as a doctor, he recognizes this: “The patient always [comes] first and I swore to that oath.” A shift in Dr. Bayne’s medical career took place when he began to make house calls in his community. He saw this as a way to get out of the organized medical environment and reflects on the benefit of this decision. A scenario he calls “typical” to house visits was that of the little old lady living across the street. In his version of this typical scenario, he began making visits to a woman named Faith, who he says couldn’t have been more aptly named. One Friday night, Faith’s husband called Dr. Bayne with an urgent medical problem. At the time, Faith was being treated for multiple diseases by multiple doctors, both of whom believed she ought to be in hospice, meaning that she had six months to live. Dr. Bayne, however, took a different approach, and simply stood next to her bedside and listened to her tell stories about her life. Faith told a story of how she had been hit by a drunk driver on her wedding day, becoming physically disabled because of it. She shouldn’t have been able to walk again, but she recovered and dedicated her life to serving others, becoming a beloved member of the community. Dr. Bayne remembers Faith as “constantly getting up and running to [answer] the phone;” it was people calling her to thank her for everything she’d done for them. A few months later, something happened that reminded Dr. Bayne why he started practicing medicine in the first place, and why it was so important to practice it in the community around him. To find out what brought about this revelation, watch the video above.

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